Hijabs Are Good for You! Study Says | WSJ

  • October 20, 2021

By BRIAN SULLIVANPosted May 13, 2019 07:11:16The number of people who choose to wear a headscarf in public is growing faster than the number of women who do so, according to a new survey.

About 20% of women in their 20s and 30s wear a hijab in public, while only 8% of men do so.

The survey, by a women’s advocacy group, the International Institute for Women, surveyed more than 1,400 people in 25 countries, looking at gender, age, education and other factors.

The institute’s survey director, Risa Hijazi, said that more than 80% of respondents said they did not have a clear definition of what constitutes wearing a headcovering, and the survey showed that hijab-wearing women are more likely to wear hijab.

“What we are seeing is an increasingly diverse mix of women,” Hijabi said.

“More and more, people are identifying as being ‘nontraditional,’ and more and more are choosing to wear something that is not traditional.”

Hijabs are a symbol of religious freedom in many Muslim countries, and women in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) have long been the target of violence, especially in the Arab world.

In 2015, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) released a video in which masked men threatened the head of a woman in a hijab who had been driving a car with her daughter, killing her.

The video showed a woman being driven by masked men through a neighborhood, and she was then shown being dragged behind a car by a masked man who was wearing a hijab.

The video also showed the car that she was driving being shot at, with a suicide vest next to the vehicle.

In another video released in 2017, masked men in Syria threatened to kill two women who had dressed in a traditional headscarves.

The Islamic State then posted a video of the incident on social media, which it said showed women and girls being shot in the head with Kalashnikov rifles.

The Islamic State, which is known for using video as a propaganda tool, has also posted videos showing how it has been able to recruit women into its ranks.

Hijabis are often the first to arrive at religious ceremonies in which women are supposed to cover their hair, and sometimes have to be present at them.

Hijabis, who are often seen in hijab or a full headscarftown, are often singled out for attacks in the public.

“It is an unfortunate phenomenon, especially as the number and number of attacks increase,” Haddad said.

But Hijab-waving women are not the only group of women to be targeted.

According to the United Nations, the global female suicide rate has more than doubled in the past 15 years, from 1,976 to 2,054.

Haddad added that a lot of the women she meets are in the process of deciding what to wear.

“They are having their hair cut, and they have to think about their future and what they want to do for their children, what they do for work and who they are going to marry,” Haddon said.

Some have chosen to cut off their hair altogether.

Others choose to keep their headscarfs at all times.

But the majority of hijab-wearers are still going out in public to shop and socialize, with some even going as far as wearing a mask to cover up their faces.

The study found that in the United States, women make up about 8% to 9% of the population, but make up 20% to 22% of those who wear hijab, with the rest of the country consisting of men.

The researchers said that it is not just the hijab that is under threat in the Muslim world, but the veil as a whole.

Haddada said that women are facing more restrictions in the U.S. than in any other Western country.

Hajab-wavers are more than twice as likely as hijab-wearers to be unemployed, the study showed.